• How Can We Help?

  • How Can We Help?

  • How Can We Help?

  • How Can We Help?

  • How Can We Help?

I found an injured adult bird

  • If the bird has been hit by a car or attacked by a cat or dog, and, an adult can safely do so, a helping hand is appreciated.
  • Your personal safety is first and foremost. We recommend using gloves. If you do not have gloves use fabric such as a towel, T-shirt, or whatever fabric you may have on hand. Cover the injured bird as this will reduce stress and assist in protecting yourself.
  • When a bird is covered it will lay still and not struggle pick up from behind keeping the wings close to the body.
  • With raptors, such as owls and hawks, keep in mind where the beak and feet/talons are located. You must wear heavy gloves, long sleeves to protect your hands and arms from the talons and beak. Eye protection is required.
  • Use extreme caution with birds that have long beaks, such as a heron, be sure the beak is covered securely and firmly pointing away from your face. Wear eye protection, as these birds use their beaks as a spear.
  • When trying to rescue water birds such as ducks or geese, try to get a blanket covering the eyes. If you cannot get close enough to place a blanket, then walk the bird to an area with undergrowth away from the water. Once the bird gets in the tall grass or undergrowth it will assume you can’t see it. You can then cover the duck or goose with the blanket and from behind pick up keeping wings next to the body. It is easier to rescue at dusk.
  • Never pick a bird up by the tail or wings.
  • Remember if you cannot contain the bird, safely, contact authorities for assistance or the hotline, 972-234-9453.
  • An injured bird will, if able try to defend itself. Do not pick the bird up unless you can safely do so.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly.
  • Read FAQ: How to contain and prepare wildlife for transport
  • Read FAQ: Ways to provide heat for orphan or injured wild animal
  • Read FAQ: How to locate a wildlife rehabilitator